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Practical Applications of Neuro Linguistic Programming

NLP is a series of rules and recognitions which when applied allow us to change perceptions and actions at a subconscious level.
One of the tidbits I’ve learned is that subconsciously we only hear positives.
No, Not, Don’t, Never…   Imagine sentences with these words in them and then repeat the sentence without those words.
- I will never forget --> I will forget.
- Don’t you dare! --> Do you dare?
- I will never do X again --> I will do X again.
This is how we actually hear things.  Whenever possible restate sentences with Negatives as a Positive
-  I will not forget --> I will remember
- Don’t you dare! --> Stop right there!
- I will never do X again --> I will avoid doing X  (or for extra points “I will replace X with Y”)
Additionally people subconsciously receive properly formatted directives even if they are hidden.
For example, in the theater business most of the money is actually made from snack sales (supposedly most of the money for tickets is sent to the film companies).  One of my jobs as I worked there was to help people find their theater.
The standard my managers expected was to greet the customer and then tell them which direction their theater was in.  Eight out of ten customers would then head straight to their theater.  A few would return from their theater to get snacks.  Deciding to play with a bit of NLP I decided to see what could be done.    After an hour of playing, I crafted a new statement.    I greeted them and then said:  “After you buy your snacks, head down that hall and your theater will be on your left. Enjoy your movie!”
Whereas before, only 20% would go to get snacks, afterwards 75% would immediately grab them.   Sure other factors mattered.  Around dinner time less people grabbed snacks as they had already eaten.  However, over a 50% difference?!  Wow…    (Additionally whereas before people tended to say a movie was ok or good, most people walked out and when asked told the questioner that they quote: “Enjoyed their Movie.”)
Now I didn’t take away their free will there.  Sometimes people would walk into the snack bar, look around and then decide they didn’t want anything.  However, the directive would catch anyone who hadn’t already chosen differently.   If someone had already decided to go to the bathroom first they would ignore me.  If they were late for their movie they would ignore me.  I even had a couple aware people laugh at my “trick” and ask if they got a reward for noticing it.   That expression of NLP seemed to affect people who hadn’t decided yet.
If your mind is undecided you will usually accept the first programming you receive.  You can choose otherwise, but your choice now has to compete with your original “belief” and for some reason we usually tend to have to actually do work to change our minds.  Most will just “go with it.”
Additionally… Be careful with asking questions.  If a person hasn’t decided something they will accept programming, but asking questions provides them with a chance to formulate an answer.  Rarely will people think their initial answer through and will go with the first one that previous programming has driven them toward.  If you tell them the answer you are looking for before you ask the question it’s amazing how many agree with you...
 

NLP is a series of rules and recognitions which when applied allow us to change perceptions and actions at a subconscious level.

One of the tidbits is that subconsciously we only hear positives.  No, Not, Don’t, Never…   Imagine sentences with these words in them and then repeat the sentence without those words.   

  1. I will never forget --> I will forget.
  2. Don’t you dare! --> Do you dare?
  3. I will never do X again --> I will do X again.

This is how we actually hear things.  Whenever possible restate sentences with Negatives as a Positive 

  1. I will not forget --> I will remember
  2. Don’t you dare! --> Stop right there!
  3. I will never do X again --> I will avoid doing X  (or for extra points “I will replace X with Y”)  


Another tidbit is that people subconsciously receive properly formatted directives even if they are hidden.

For example, in the theater business most of the money is actually made from snack sales (supposedly most of the money for tickets is sent to the film companies).  One of my jobs as I worked there was to help people find their theater.  

The standard my managers expected was to greet the customer and then tell them which direction their theater was in.  Eight out of ten customers would then head straight to their theater.  A few would return from their theater to get snacks.  

Deciding to play with a bit of NLP I decided to see what could be done.    After an hour of playing, I crafted a new statement.    I greeted them and then said:  “After you buy your snacks, head down that hall and your theater will be on your left. Enjoy your movie!”

Whereas before, only 20% would go to get snacks, afterwards 75% would immediately grab them.  Sure other factors mattered.  Around dinner time less people grabbed snacks as they had already eaten.  However, over a 50% difference?!  Wow…    

Now, this doesn't take away their free will.  Sometimes people would walk into the snack bar, look around and then decide they didn’t want anything.  However, the directive would catch anyone who hadn’t already chosen differently.  

If someone had already decided to go to the bathroom first they would ignore me.  If they were late for their movie they would ignore me.  I even had a couple aware people laugh at my “trick” and ask if they got a reward for noticing it.   The directive expressions of NLP seem to affect people who haven’t decided yet.  

If your mind is undecided you will usually accept the first programming you receive.  You can choose otherwise, but your choice now has to compete with your original “belief” and for some reason we usually tend to have to actually do work to change our minds.  Most will just “go with it.”

A final bit I've noticed… Be careful with asking questions.  If a person hasn’t decided something they will accept programming, but asking questions provides them with a chance to formulate an answer.  Rarely will people think their initial answer through and will go with the first one that previous programming has driven them toward.  If you tell them the answer you are looking for before you ask the question it’s amazing how many agree with you...  

Good luck and have fun.

Power Before Wisdom

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© Scott Reimers 2014